Crocodile Tears: the Spooks doth Protest too Much

May 12, 2015–In case you’re not aware of it, a couple of weeks ago (on April 26 to be exact) the New York Times ran a feature story on how the CIA, currying favor in Washington, had managed to elude criticism for its drone strikes up until this past January, when one of the mechanical murderers managed to blow up an American citizen being held hostage by the bad guys, plus an Italian hostage and other Americans who were playing for the bad guys but, still, were entitled to constitutional protections. Hinting at its distress at this state of affairs, the Times put a shot across the bow of the CIA by naming the head of the Counterterrorism Center who was dismissed after that fiasco, his replacement, and the new head of the Operations Directorate (or National Clandestine Service, depending on which musical chair you are using at the moment).

Today the Times carries a letter to the editor signed by twenty ex-CIA officers complaining of the newspaper’s action. They insist that “nothing is to be gained by ‘outing’ career operations officers” and asserting that “Congress overwhelmingly passed the Intelligence Identities Protection Act of 1982 precisely to protect” these dedicated men and women.

With me so far?

Who are these paragons of intelligence who have the virtue to cast stones? They include David Petraeus, former CIA chief convicted of leaking classified data to his girlfriend; former CIA deputy director Frank Carlucci, called in to save Ronald Reagan’s chestnuts from impeachment for violations of the Arms Control Export Act; former CIA director John M. Deutch, found to have improperly removed classified information from CIA headquarters; former CIA director Michael V. Hayden, found by the Senate’s investigation to have lied to Congress about CIA torture programs; former CIA director Porter Goss, who approved subordinates’ destruction of evidence material to a criminal investigation of CIA torture programs; former CIA director George J. Tenet, who started the CIA torture program; and former CIA director R. James Woolsey, who once said he’d have to crash a plane onto White House grounds to get the attention of the president. There are others but this is plenty to make the point.

For years now the Central Intelligence Agency has played fast and loose with its responsibilities in terms of simple public information. The names of intelligence officers is a good example. The agency routinely redacts names from documents it declassifies, and, starting with Jose Rodriguez, has now extended the practice to serving officers in senior positions. This is not admissible.

The sole basis on which the identity of an officer can be kept secret is the aforesaid Intelligence Identities Protection Act (Public Law 97-200). The law only protects serving “covert agents.” Covert agents are defined as officers of the clandestine service serving outside the United States or having served outside the United States within the past five years.

The recently-relieved officer who headed the Counterterrorism Center had been its chief since 2006–any eligibility he had to remain a covert agent expired four years ago. The named Deputy Director for Operations comes to that post from service as chief of the Special Activities Division, which does paramilitary operations. His last known overseas posting was as chief of station in Kabul. The Times did nothing wrong. Its only offense, if it be called that, was to remind the spooks of their favor in playing the CIA’s game this far.

More to the point, no CIA officer at the level of center or division chief or above, and certainly no one who is a deputy director, should ever be entitled to clandestinity. These people routinely have to deal with outside authorities including congressional overseers. Putting masks on those people makes a mockery of accountability.

Our former CIA chiefs shed crocodile tears. –And half of them have no business on this podium anyway. Accountability is the business of the fourth estate–and should be a gold coin in government. The Times names names that should have been public in the first place.

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